Mr. Beagan's assignments are posted daily on his calendar.

Calendar

  • Exploring Literature

    Hello. Welcome to Day 11 of remote learning. You can email me anytime if you have questions about the work or your grades at jbeaganpccam@gmail.com.  Email me if you’re interested in submitting late work or if you need help accessing Pupil Path. Today’s assignment is due Tuesday, April 7th by 8 am.

     

    The assignment has 4 steps:

     

    Step 1 → Finish reading Act III of The Crucible (by Wednesday, April 8th)

    Step 2 → Read this lesson and take the subsequent quiz to examine the character of Betty Parris from Arthur Miller's ''The Crucible.'' Betty is considered an archetypal and allegorical figure in the play.

    Step 3 → Rebecca Nurse remains a stalwart pillar of sense and reason amid the hysteria that consumes Salem, Massachusetts, in Arthur Miller's play, The Crucible. Read this lesson and take the subsequent quiz for an overview of her character throughout the play.

    Step 4 → Read this lesson and take the subsequent quiz to learn about the character Martha Corey from Arthur Miller's The Crucible. Martha Corey is distinctly interesting in the fact that she never directly appears on stage in the play, but still contributes importantly to the drama and message.

    Mr. Beagan
  • AP Literature and Composition

    Hello. Welcome to Day 11 of remote learning. You can email me anytime if you have questions about the work or your grades at jbeaganpccam@gmail.com.  Email me if you’re interested in submitting late work or if you need help accessing Pupil Path. Today’s assignment is due Tuesday, April 7th by 8 am.

     

    The assignment has 4 steps:

     

    Step 1 → William Carlos Williams was a famous American modernist poet. His poems 'The Red Wheelbarrow' and 'Landscape with the Fall of Icarus' illustrate several aspects of modernist poetry. Watch this video and take the subsequent quiz to introduce yourself to Williams and his poetry, and test your understanding with a quiz.

    Step 2 → Edward Estlin Cummings, or E.E. Cummings as he was better known, was a modernist poet who wrote poems in a new and innovative style. Watch this video and take the subsequent quiz to find out more about him and analyze two of his famous poems.

    Step 3 → Edna St. Vincent Millay wrote modernist poetry by combining traditional forms with new ideas. Watch this video and take the subsequent quiz to take a look at two of Millay's poems and analyze them for form and ideas.

    Step 4 → Wallace Stevens' poem 'Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird' is an important American modernist poem that can be seen in several different ways. Watch this video and take the subsequent quiz to find out more about the poem and how to analyze it.

    Mr. Beagan
  • ESL 3

    Hello. Welcome to Day 11 of remote learning.  You will have a quiz tomorrow on themes in Frankenstein.  You can study by reviewing all the questions from the assignments since the last test. You can email me anytime if you have questions about the work or your grades at jbeaganpccam@gmail.com.  Email me if you’re interested in submitting late work or if you need help accessing Pupil Path. Today’s assignment is due Tuesday, April 7th by 8 am.

     

    The assignment has 4 steps:

     

    Step 1 → Mary Shelley's 1818 novel, 'Frankenstein,' is far more than a sci-fi horror masterpiece. Victor Frankenstein and his monster are tortured by conflicting loyalties and contradictory ambitions, their inner lives as messy and complicated as the world they make.  Read this lesson and take the subsequent quiz on conflict in Frankenstein.

    Step 2 → Read this lesson and take the subsequent quiz on beauty, knowledge, and familial relationships as motifs from the novel, ''Frankenstein'', by Mary Shelley. The lesson will also analyze how those motifs develop some of the themes of the novel.

    Step 3 → Watch this video and take the subsequent quiz to explore the use of Gothic elements in Mary Shelley's 1818 masterpiece, 'Frankenstein.' Though Gothic literature was a popular genre at this time, Shelley's ingenious use of these elements is what makes her novel a timeless classic.

    Step 4 → Read this lesson and take the subsequent quiz to explore the vocabulary in 'Frankenstein' that Mary Shelley employed to describe the desires and emotions of her characters. Learn words like 'indefatigable' and 'venerable' so that you can replace overused words like 'awesome' and 'interesting.' Learn some background information about this literary classic, which continues to be relevant even in the 21st century.

    Mr. Beagan
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Greeting to Students: Remote learning directions

You can email me anytime with questions about the classwork.  Use this email: jbeaganpccam@gmail.com and I will get back to you during school hours. Check my teacher page daily to find your assignments for the day.  I will post your first assignment by 8am on Monday, March 23rd.  I will post the assignment for Tuesday by 8 am on Tuesday, through Friday. 

Your daily assignments are due by 8 am the following day.  In addition to course credit, this is also how I will take "attendance".

If you want to get ahead, click your class-link below to create your study.com account.  You will have to answer questions on study.com every day.

AP Literature and Composition

ESL 3

Exploring Literature

Miss you guys,

Mr. Beagan

Advanced Placement: English Literature

1-29-19 (parent contact)

Dear Parents and Students of ESL 2,

Today was a rigorous first day of school for Liberty's ESL 2 students.  They learned what a bubble sheet is (a signal that they will receive a grade based on the accuracy of their responses).  They also learned that a vocabulary root is the smallest unit of meaning contained in a word.  Students will memorize 40+  Greek and Latin vocabulary roots this semester.  Then, they will apply that knowledge to the analysis of thousands of unfamiliar words that they will continue to encounter in all their classrooms, in high-stakes standardized tests and in complex texts for the rest of their lives. 

The students next steps should be to never leave a bubble blank!  Whenever a student has a test or classwork involving a bubble sheet, they should count the number of questions so they know how much time they have for each question.  See the picture below.  Why did most students get numbers 11 and 12 wrong?  Numbers 13-24 consisted of 12 True or False questions.  If students do not know the answer, they should always guess.  For numbers 11 and 12, what would be the student's chances of getting the answer correct if they guessed at random?  What about number 13?   What is the harm in guessing?  (There is no harm in guessing.) A better question might be: what is the most effective way to guess?